Featured Images

StarDate Radio: January 26 — Soudan Laboratory

A half-mile below the hills of northern Minnesota, visitors to the Soudan Mine State Park face a choice. More »

StarDate Radio: January 25 — Perseus

As befits his status as a hero, Perseus strides boldly across the sky this evening. More »

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Stargazing: January 25

As befits his status as a hero, Perseus strides boldly across the sky this evening. He is high overhead at nightfall, crowning the sky with a couple of streamers of moderately bright stars. More »

StarDate Radio: January 24 — Procyon

One “dog” star leads another across the sky on winter nights. More »

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Stargazing: January 24

One dog star leads another across the sky on winter nights. Procyon, the little dog, precedes the Dog Star, Sirius. They are in good view in the eastern sky by a couple of hours after sunset. More »

StarDate Radio: January 23 — Occultations

Asteroids are always getting in the way. More »

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Stargazing: January 23

A faint river of stars meanders through the evening sky this month. Eridanus winds its way across a large section of the southern sky. It begins near Rigel, the brightest star in the adjoining constellation Orion. More »

StarDate Radio: January 22 — Moon and Mars

A thousand or so large asteroids follow orbits that bring them close to Earth. More »

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Stargazing: January 22

The planet Mars is easy to pick out this evening because it stands close to the crescent Moon. It looks like a moderately bright yellow-orange star to the left of the Moon. The much brighter planet Venus, the “evening star,” stands below them. More »

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The History of the Telescope Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment
Black Holes Encyclopedia Texas Native Skies

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