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StarDate Radio: July 29 — Dark Center

The heaviest single object in the entire galaxy is also one of the most difficult to see because it produces no energy at all. More »

StarDate Radio: July 28 — The Brick

The center of the Milky Way is already crowded with stars. More »

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Stargazing: July 28

Teapot-shaped Sagittarius is low in the south-southeast as darkness falls. With binoculars, look just above its spout for two stellar nurseries, known as M8 and M20. They look like fuzzy patches of light. New stars are taking shape in these regions. More »

StarDate Radio: July 27 — Galactic Track

Big clouds of gas and dust appear to be taking a roller-coaster ride around the center of the Milky Way galaxy. More »

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Stargazing: July 27

The star cluster M13, in the constellation Hercules, is high overhead as darkness falls. This family of hundreds of thousands of stars is visible to the unaided eye as a smudge of light. Binoculars hint at its glory, as dozens of stars pop into view. More »

StarDate Radio: July 26 — Old Family

When a typical star cluster is born, it’s a tightly packed family — hundreds of stars that were born from the same big cloud of gas and dust, all jammed into a fairly small volume of space. More »

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Stargazing: July 26

The Moon is new today, so it is lost from sight as it crosses between Earth and the Sun. It will return to view in a couple of nights as a thin crescent shortly after sunset. More »

StarDate Radio: July 25 — Messier Clusters

One of the first items on almost any amateur astronomer’s “to-do” list is completing the Messier marathon — looking at all 110 objects cataloged by Charles Messier. More »

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Stargazing: July 25

Hercules, which is sometimes called the kneeling giant, stands high overhead this evening. None of its stars stand out. But you can find Hercules by picking out a square pattern of stars in the giant’s stomach known as the Keystone. More »

Special Features

The History of the Telescope Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment
Black Holes Encyclopedia Texas Native Skies

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