Featured Images

StarDate Radio: November 27 — Tadpole Galaxy

A dragon and a tadpole slither low across the northern sky this evening, curling around the North Star. More »

StarDate Radio: November 26 — Galaxy Mergers

Galaxies could use a set of traffic cops — they’re always running into each other. More »

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Stargazing: November 26

The stars of winter are working their way into the evening sky. Look for them in the east beginning around 10 or 11 p.m.: Orion, the hunter; Gemini, the twins; and Canis Major, the big dog, with its “dog star” Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky. More »

StarDate Radio: November 25 — Moon and Mars

One of the problems of long-distance travel is jet lag — the difference between the time at your destination and the time according to your body’s internal clock. More »

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Stargazing: November 25

The little planet Mars is in good view this evening. It looks like an orange star close to the left of the Moon. They are low in the southwest at nightfall, and set a couple of hours later. More »

StarDate Radio: November 24 — Orion Returns

As if Thanksgiving dinner, endless football, and cool autumn days weren’t enough, the night sky offers one more treat to look forward to at this time of year: the return of Orion, the hunter, to prime viewing time. More »

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Stargazing: November 24

Orion, the hunter, is returning to prime viewing time. Tonight, it climbs into good view in the east by around 9 or 9:30. Look for its “belt” of three stars, which points almost straight up from the horizon as the hunter rises. More »

StarDate Radio: November 23 — Epsilon Aurigae

It’s not unusual for a star to change brightness over a period of days, months, or even years. More »

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Stargazing: November 23

Auriga, the charioteer, is low in the northeast early this evening and crowns the sky in the wee hours of the morning. Its leading light is brilliant Capella, one of the brightest stars in the night sky. More »

Special Features

The History of the Telescope Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment
Black Holes Encyclopedia Texas Native Skies

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