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StarDate Radio: September 22 — Autumnal Equinox

The oldest astronomical instrument is the calendar. More »

StarDate Radio: September 21 — MAVEN

Modern-day Mars is the planetary equivalent of a high desert — cold and dry. More »

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Stargazing: September 21

Autumn arrives tomorrow at the autumnal equinox, the day on which the Sun crosses the equator heading south. Over the next three months the Sun will move even farther south, bringing shorter, cooler days to the northern hemisphere. More »

StarDate Radio: September 20 — Moon and Regulus

For the star Regulus, the secret of looking young just may be cannibalism. More »

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Stargazing: September 20

Regulus, the brightest star of Leo, the lion, stands close to the left of the crescent Moon at dawn tomorrow. Regulus consists of at least four stars, although only one of them is bright enough to see with the eye alone. More »

StarDate Radio: September 19 — Moon and Jupiter

If you’re a fan of smoldering volcanoes, then you can always visit such exotic locations as Hawaii, Iceland, or Italy. More »

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Stargazing: September 19

The planet Jupiter shines like a brilliant star to the upper left of the Moon early tomorrow. Binoculars reveal its four largest moons. One of them is covered with giant volcanoes while another may have an ocean of liquid water beneath its icy crust. More »

StarDate Radio: September 18 — Moon and Companions

The Moon has a couple of bright companions before dawn tomorrow. More »

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Stargazing: September 18

The Moon has a couple of bright companions before dawn tomorrow. The brilliant planet Jupiter stands to the lower left of the Moon, with the fainter star Procyon a little farther to the Moon’s right or upper right. More »

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The History of the Telescope Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment
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