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StarDate Radio: October 31 — Halloween

For the most part, astronomers aren’t a superstitious lot. More »

StarDate Radio: October 30 — Morning Mercury

The only spacecraft ever to orbit the planet Mercury has gotten especially close to it over the past few months — as close as 15 miles. More »

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Stargazing: October 30

Mercury is just peeking into view in the morning sky. The planet is quite low in the east-southeast in twilight, so you need a clear horizon to spot it. Although it looks like a bright star, it is tough to find through the glow. More »

StarDate Radio: October 29 — Local Bubble

Ten million years ago, some massive stars close to our own solar system blew themselves to bits. More »

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Stargazing: October 29

Pegasus, the winged horse, crosses high overhead this evening. Four bright stars that form a large square outline his body. If you hold your two fists side by side at arm’s length, they will fit nicely into the Great Square. More »

StarDate Radio: October 28 — New Distance

Measuring the distances to astronomical objects is hard work. More »

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Stargazing: October 28

A thick crescent Moon pops into view low in the south-southwest at nightfall. As the sky grows darker, the entire lunar disk should become visible, because the dark portion of the Moon is illuminated by sunlight reflected off of Earth. More »

StarDate Radio: October 27 — Moon and Mars

Like a runner on a treadmill, Mars is moving quickly just to stay in place right now. More »

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Stargazing: October 27

Mars is sliding against the background of stars at about the same rate at which that background is moving from night to night. As a result, Mars will appear at almost the same point in the southwest in the evening sky for the next several weeks. More »

Special Features

The History of the Telescope Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment
Black Holes Encyclopedia Texas Native Skies

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