Radio’s Guide to the Universe

Sandy Wood, voice of StarDateSandy Wood, the voice of StarDateStarDate debuted in 1978, making it the longest-running national radio science feature in the country. It airs on more than 300 radio stations.

StarDate tells listeners what to look for in the night sky, and explains the science, history, and skylore behind these objects. It also keeps listeners up to date on the latest research findings and space missions. And it offers tidbits on astronomy in the arts and popular culture, providing ways for people with diverse interests to keep up with the universe.

StarDate is a production of The University of Texas McDonald Observatory, which also produces the Spanish-language Universo Online web site and the bi-monthly StarDate magazine.

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Today on StarDate

September 1-7: War!

World War II started 75 years ago this week, and many astronomers played a role in the war. We’ll talk about astronomy and the war, and we’ll have details on some beautiful sights in the weekend sky.

September 8-14: The Flying Horse

Pegasus climbs high across the sky on September evenings, and we’ll talk about some of its more interesting features, including some nearby newborn stars and a family of ancient stars. Join us for Pegasus and more.

September 15-21: Moon Meanderings

The Moon passes several bright stars and planets this week, including Jupiter, the heart of the lion, and the little dog, and we’ll have details. We’ll also talk about the next wave of explorers at Mars.

September 22-28: Biggest of the Big

All stars are big, but some are enormous — monsters that are big enough to span a solar system. We’ll talk about some of these giants, including one that’s getting ready for its final act. Join us for this and more.

September 29-30: Near and Far

We’ll “move” the supergiant star that’s at the heart of the scorpion close to home this week, and offer up a time capsule from 27,000 years ago. Join us for Antares, the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, and much more.

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