Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's main instrument is a telescopic camera, which will map parts of the Martian surface with unprecedented clarity. Scientists will use the pictures to plot the landing sites for future robotic and manned missions.The pictures and other observations also are providing new data in the search for water on Mars. The observations have helped locate minerals that formed in a watery environment. MRO also carries a radar system that discovered deposits of frozen water below the surface.

Resources

Explorations in 2013 Find out about scheduled missions to our solar...
Explorations in 2011 Find out about scheduled missions to our solar...
Mars Mars inspires speculation like no other world in...
Explorations in 2014 Find out about scheduled missions to our solar...
Explorations in 2012 Find out about scheduled missions to our solar...
Explorations in 2010 Find out about scheduled missions to our solar...

Featured Images

Fresh Martian impact crater seen by an orbiting spacecraft in late 2013
Fresh Impact Friday, February 7, 2014
High-resolution view of Phobos, moon of Mars
Doomed Moon Sunday, January 13, 2013
Composite view of Curiosity rover landing and operating on Mars
Drop In, Stay Awhile Monday, August 6, 2012
Possible rivulets of water flowing on Mars
Drippy Planet Monday, August 8, 2011
Ground and orbital views of Opportunity rover at Santa Maria crater
Looking In Tuesday, February 8, 2011
Martian Tattoo Monday, November 2, 2009
Dropping In Tuesday, May 27, 2008
Battered Moon Sunday, April 20, 2008
Danger Zone Friday, March 7, 2008
Martian Dust-Up Sunday, November 25, 2007
Nowhere to Hide Monday, February 5, 2007
Frosty Morning Friday, October 20, 2006
Peek-A-Boo! Sunday, October 8, 2006
Adding Color Monday, April 10, 2006
Adding to the Fleet Friday, March 10, 2006

Radio Programs

Warming Mars Warming up a desert planet Sunday, February 19, 2012
Moon and Mars Watery oases on a desert world Thursday, January 12, 2012

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